Cadaver Needle

2015

  • Shape - craft
  • Blade material 15n20 and 1084 Damascus steel
more...

Although I rarely take commissions, sometimes one comes along that I just can't resist. Last year a mortuary technician asked me to replicate her favourite cavader needle in damascus steel to celebrate her long service award.

Travelling Technician

2015

  • Shape - craft
  • Blade material 15n20 and 1084 Damascus steel
more...

Blade Show Award winner

135mm Curved Cadaver Needle 135mm Straight Cadaver Needle 155mm Scalpel 2 Specimen Bottles Notebook and pen

Although I rarely take commissions, sometimes one comes along that I just can't resist. Last year a mortuary technician asked me to replicate her favourite cavader needle in damascus steel to celebrate her long service award.

After completing the first needle, I wanted to take the idea of pretty medical equipment further so I made these two sets of tools for an imaginary peripatetic mortician. Although there are frequent historical examples of 'Field Surgery' kits, I liked the idea of making a set of beautiful autopsy or biopsy tools that a mortuary technican could be proud of and could carry with them.

The case is designed to open out and present the tools for easy use.

Silver Silver

2013

  • Shape - jj
  • Blade material Steel and silver laminate
  • Scales Sterling silver
more...

Silver Silver was a delight to make. Coming after a batch of very intricate and challenging knives, 'Silver Silver' felt like coming home. The juxaposition of steel and silver is one that I keep returning to; the warm silver and the cool steel. The knife uses one of the last blades cut from the laminated silver and steel material that I made for my PhD.

'Silver Silver' used a hidden riveting technique. The silver pins were designed to disguise the structural pins holding the knife together – the mechanism of the knife relies on stainless steel tubes that are plugged with the silver wire. When the silver is riveted, all the pieces are held together securely. One of the features of this shape of knife is how close to the back edge the middle pin is. Structurally, a 2mm steel pin is perfect but by using the tube and pin method only the top of the silver wire comes to the surface of the scales to blend seamlessly with the silver scales and the integrity of the knife is retained.

Ray

2013

  • Shape - jj
  • Blade material Grace Damascus
  • Scales Glove Leather, gold beads and ray skin
more...

These scales use an assembly technique that combines both riveting and screwing. The knife is assembled and riveted within titanium liners; the scales are built around secondary titanium liners and are screwed on as a final process. This knife was an exercise bobbles and camoflage. I used gold plated screws to hold the scales in place and replaced some of the rayskin bobbles with gold beads.

Rayskin is an amazing material. It is traditionally used for Japanese sword handles and has an amazing texture. Each bobble is extremely hard and wear resistant, making working with it challenging. I set the rayskin down inside an insert that was cut to go around each of the rayskin bobbles and is covered with beautifully soft glove leather.

Tiny Steel Cocoon

2013

  • Shape - trad
  • Blade material O-1
  • Handle material
  • Scales Stainless steel mesh
more...

I wanted to make a tiny knife that was uniquely mine. I had combined textiles and knives on some of my previous work and I was curious to see if I could do the same on such a tiny scale.

The finished knife is a folding clip point slipjoint. The scales are stainless steel mesh, edged with silk thread embroidery. Cocoons have appeared in my work previously...I like the changing state of them, how they have the possibility to be something different.

sliver of darkness

2013

  • Shape - jj
  • Blade material RWL34
  • Scales Wrought iron
  • Pins iron
  • Spring material RWL34
  • Lock slip joint
more...

This knife was never meant to happen. I had to demonstrate the construction of a knife for a photographer visiting my workshop and this is the result. Beautiful tactile, highly textured wrought iron scales and bright stainless spring and blade.

Waelcyrie North and Waelcyrie South

2012

  • Shape - ceremonial
  • Blade material Damasteel
  • Handle material
more...

In 2012, I decided to initiate a collaborative project with another British knife maker, Guy Stainthorp. Guy produces very defferent work to me and seemed perfect to take his beaautiful practical daggers and turn them into something that neither of us would have made on our own.

The starting point for my inspiration was the elegant waist on the handles; they were just begging to be turned into corsets...and if you've got corsets then you have to have a female form!

As a craftsman, often materials come first; I can't imagine ding a design and not knowing what I'll make it out of, so material experimentation is vital during the early stages of a design. I have been playing with glove leather and it is a truly amazing material..strong, soft, sensual, flexible and beautiful to work with.

So with a basic design palette of corsets, daggers and leather, I started tracking down an old poem about Valkyries and Vikings that I had read as a child. The valkyries in this story are described in a more domestic setting, weaving the fate of men and it tells of the Vikings in Ireland.

This is the story of how 'Walcyrie North' and 'Walcyrie South' got made.

Stir

2012

  • Shape - jj
  • Blade material RWL34
  • Scales Brass and Copper
  • Spring material RWL34
  • Lock Slip Joint
more...

The scale of 'Stir' were taken from a test sample made to test the parameters whilst stirring layers of brass and copper. The section of the metal was chosen carefully to select the most unusual patterning. Although copper and brass are relatively compatible metals, using friction stir welding technology to stir them together for decorative proposes, is relatively unexplored.

Friction Stir Welding is a technology that was invented and patented by TWI in Sheffield.

In friction stir welding, a tool with a probe is rotated whilst being forced into the metal, usually the area where two plates are held together. The frictional heat that is generated by this process softens the metal sufficiently to produce a 'plastic' flow that effectively stirs the metal from each section into the other to create a weld. Unlike normal welding, the metals never melt and friction stir welding is considered a 'solid phase welding method'.

Shakudo #6

2011

  • Shape - jj
  • Blade material RWL34
  • Scales Shakudo (2% gold) + Copper
  • Liners titanium
  • Spring material RWL34
more...

In 2010, Coilin O'Dubhghaill asked if I would be prepared to use some gold and silver alloys that had been working on.

This knife is one of a set of six that was designed to showcase some of the series of patinated alloys that had being working on.

Shakudo (gold and copper) and shibuichi (silver and copper) are often seen used in sword fittings and decorative elements with traditional Japanese swords and armour. Using a combination of alloys means that a range of subtle colours can be obtained within a single metal piece.

Often when these decorative alloys are combined in a single piece, the aim of the craftsman is to make the join as invisible so that the transition from one colour to the other is crisp. Because of this, cold joining is often used and solder is avoided if possible because the solder shows as a different colour line in the piece when it has been patinated. I decided to see what would happen if I made a feature of my joints by welding them...I want the weld area to be a visually interesting, softer, alloy of alloys.

These knives are made using a new technique for me. It is a combination of traditional riveting and screw fitting. Because the scales are patinated, they need to be handled very carefully and with the minimum of workshop processes. The knives have the central part working as a complete knife, riveted together with titanium sides. The scales are then screwed on as the final process.

The blade is held between phosphor bronze washers and the spring has 'secret' internal filework.

Shakudo #1

2011

  • Shape - jj
  • Blade material RWL34
  • Scales Shakudo (2% gold)
  • Liners titanium
  • Spring material RWL34
more...

In 2010, Coilin O'Dubhghaill asked if I would be prepared to use some gold and silver alloys that had been working on.

This knife is one of a set of six that was designed to showcase some of the series of patinated alloys that had being working on.

Shakudo (gold and copper) and shibuichi (silver and copper) are often seen used in sword fittings and decorative elements with traditional Japanese swords and armour. Using a combination of alloys means that a range of subtle colours can be obtained within a single metal piece.

The pieces of metal had a lovely gentle waney edge from rolling the cast billet and I was keen to incorporate these edges into the final knife.

These knives are made using a new technique for me. It is a combination of traditional riveting and screw fitting. Because the scales are patinated, they need to be handled very carefully and with the minimum of workshop processes. The knives have the central part working as a complete knife, riveted together with titanium sides. The scales are then screwed on as the final process.

The blade is held between phosphor bronze washers and the spring has 'secret' internal filework.