Shibuichi #2

2011

  • Shape - jj
  • Blade material RWL34
  • Scales Shibuichi (25% silver)
  • Liners titanium
  • Spring material RWL34
more...

£400

In 2010, Coilin O'Dubhghaill asked if I would be prepared to use some gold and silver alloys that had been working on.

This knife is one of a set of six that was designed to showcase some of the series of patinated alloys that had being working on.

Shakudo (gold and copper) and shibuichi (silver and copper) are often seen used in sword fittings and decorative elements with traditional Japanese swords and armour. Using a combination of alloys means that a range of subtle colours can be obtained within a single metal piece.

The pieces of metal had a lovely gentle waney edge from rolling the cast billet and I was keen to incorporate these edges into the final knife.

These knives are made using a new technique for me. It is a combination of traditional riveting and screw fitting. Because the scales are patinated, they need to be handled very carefully and with the minimum of workshop processes. The knives have the central part working as a complete knife, riveted together with titanium sides. The scales are then screwed on as the final process.

The blade is held between phosphor bronze washers and the spring has 'secret' internal filework.

Shakudo #6

2011

  • Shape - jj
  • Blade material RWL34
  • Scales Shakudo (2% gold) + Copper
  • Liners titanium
  • Spring material RWL34
more...

£400

In 2010, Coilin O'Dubhghaill asked if I would be prepared to use some gold and silver alloys that had been working on.

This knife is one of a set of six that was designed to showcase some of the series of patinated alloys that had being working on.

Shakudo (gold and copper) and shibuichi (silver and copper) are often seen used in sword fittings and decorative elements with traditional Japanese swords and armour. Using a combination of alloys means that a range of subtle colours can be obtained within a single metal piece.

Often when these decorative alloys are combined in a single piece, the aim of the craftsman is to make the join as invisible so that the transition from one colour to the other is crisp. Because of this, cold joining is often used and solder is avoided if possible because the solder shows as a different colour line in the piece when it has been patinated. I decided to see what would happen if I made a feature of my joints by welding them...I want the weld area to be a visually interesting, softer, alloy of alloys.

These knives are made using a new technique for me. It is a combination of traditional riveting and screw fitting. Because the scales are patinated, they need to be handled very carefully and with the minimum of workshop processes. The knives have the central part working as a complete knife, riveted together with titanium sides. The scales are then screwed on as the final process.

The blade is held between phosphor bronze washers and the spring has 'secret' internal filework.

Shakudo #1

2011

  • Shape - jj
  • Blade material RWL34
  • Scales Shakudo (2% gold)
  • Liners titanium
  • Spring material RWL34
more...

£400

In 2010, Coilin O'Dubhghaill asked if I would be prepared to use some gold and silver alloys that had been working on.

This knife is one of a set of six that was designed to showcase some of the series of patinated alloys that had being working on.

Shakudo (gold and copper) and shibuichi (silver and copper) are often seen used in sword fittings and decorative elements with traditional Japanese swords and armour. Using a combination of alloys means that a range of subtle colours can be obtained within a single metal piece.

The pieces of metal had a lovely gentle waney edge from rolling the cast billet and I was keen to incorporate these edges into the final knife.

These knives are made using a new technique for me. It is a combination of traditional riveting and screw fitting. Because the scales are patinated, they need to be handled very carefully and with the minimum of workshop processes. The knives have the central part working as a complete knife, riveted together with titanium sides. The scales are then screwed on as the final process.

The blade is held between phosphor bronze washers and the spring has 'secret' internal filework.

'Red Wine Gecko'

2011

  • Shape - rescale
  • Blade material O-1
  • Scales Burl Thuya and Glove Leather
  • Liners O-1
more...

I rarely take on commissions but this intrigued me. In 2008, Shing (www.shingcrafts.com) made a folder to one of his very early designs. With the completed folder, the original customer also received a spare blade and spring.

In 2011, the current owner gave me the opportunity to make up the spare pieces and reinterpret them into a folder of my own design.

Shakudo #5

2011

  • Shape - jj
  • Blade material RWL34
  • Scales Shakudo (2% gold); gold; silver; copper
  • Spring material RWL34
more...

£500

In 2010, Coilin O'Dubhghaill asked if I would be prepared to use some gold and silver alloys that had been working on.

This knife is one of a set of six that was designed to showcase some of the series of patinated alloys that had being working on.

Shakudo (gold and copper) and shibuichi (silver and copper) are often seen used in sword fittings and decorative elements with traditional Japanese swords and armour. Using a combination of alloys means that a range of subtle colours can be obtained within a single metal piece.

Often when these decorative alloys are combined in a single piece, the aim of the craftsman is to make the join as invisible so that the transition from one colour to the other is crisp. Because of this, cold joining is often used and solder is avoided if possible because the solder shows as a different colour line in the piece when it has been patinated.

These knives are made using a new technique for me. It is a combination of traditional riveting and screw fitting. Because the scales are patinated, they need to be handled very carefully and with the minimum of workshop processes. The knives have the central part working as a complete knife, riveted together with titanium sides. The scales are then screwed on as the final process.

The blade is held between phosphor bronze washers and the spring has 'secret' internal filework.

tweed corset knife

2011

  • Shape - jj
  • Blade material RWL34
  • Scales Woolen tweed
  • Liners titanium
  • Spring material RWL34
more...

This knife was designed to go with a corset and it can be worn as a necklace or like a pocket watch.

The fabric is a Welsh woolen tweed made in Llanwerdd Wells.

The fittings are silver.

Clippoint Knife

2011

  • Shape - trad
  • Scales British grown laburnum
  • Liners O-1
more...

This knife is made using traditional Sheffield riveted construction. The non-locking 'slip-joint' design is based on an old Sheffield model with a clip point blade shape.

The scales are made from a locally grown Laburnum Anagyroides tree that was felled in Edale in 2007. Laburnum wood is hard and closely grained and takes a fine finish. Often prized for veneer work, laburnum has a striking two colour timber. The outer layer is generally a pale cream but the inner heart wood that was used here, is a dark rich brown.

The knife was made as a retirement present for a staff member of Sheffield Hallam University.

Almost all of the work that I do on my knives is by hand. This gives me a precision that is hard to achieve by machine but it also means a nicer, more meditative quieter working environment.

My main tools are a bench vice and a large assortment of cutlers', jewellers' and watchmakers' tools. Although my designs often look contemporary, a knifemaker from 150 years ago would be very familiar with my working environment.

UKPK

2011

  • Shape - rescale
  • Scales Micarta
  • Lock Spyderco Slipit
more...

Over the years I have used Spyderco's UKPK as a base knife for a few modification. This was one of the simplest and the most satisfactory. The micarta is a man made material that is generally used for the handles of knives that are expected to withstand extreme use and working conditions, however the gentle burgundy colour with a soft 'washed' finish made a wonderfully tactile folder. The shape of the handle was changed to make it softer slimmer whilst still maintaining the fundamental usefulness of the original knife.

cocoon #2

2010

  • Shape - wn
  • Scales aluminium, cotton, silk and wool
  • Liners titanium
  • Lock slip joint
more...

£400

During 2009, I had to find ways of making knives without a workshop. The range of modified Spyderco knives were a direct result of this restriction but when I started to use textile techniques to join different materials, it made me wonder which other textile techniques I could take back into my knife making.

Over the years, I have seen many extraordinary knives including fantasy and art knives that use all the accepted knife vocabulary. They are shiny, spiky, aggressive; they look like knives – even those knives that are never intended to be used.

These pieces are a direct reaction to these; soft, warm and visually non-threatening. How much of the accepted knife vocabulary can be removed and still have a functioning knife?

They give me the opportunity to start reappraising the role of the domesticity and feminity in knives. Knifemaking is traditionally seen as a very male trade but during my research into Sheffield knifemaking, the role of women keeps cropping up. Much of the piece work for folder parts was done by women in their homes, usually their kitchen or a small outhouse. I suspect that the awareness of these invisible women will manifest itself in future knives too.

Most of the foundation work is woollen felt and I use a mixture of wet felting and needle felting to create the desired affect. Some pieces are numo felted; incorporating silk, cotton and other mesh in the structure of the felt. The surface is then stitched, reworked, embroidered and embellished.

cocoon #3

2010

  • Shape - jj
  • Scales aluminium, cotton, silk and wool
  • Liners titanium
  • Lock slip joint
more...

£400

During 2009, I had to find ways of making knives without a workshop. The range of modified Spyderco knives were a direct result of this restriction but when I started to use textile techniques to join different materials, it made me wonder which other textile techniques I could take back into my knife making.

Over the years, I have seen many extraordinary knives including fantasy and art knives that use all the accepted knife vocabulary. They are shiny, spiky, aggressive; they look like knives – even those knives that are never intended to be used.

These pieces are a direct reaction to these; soft, warm and visually non-threatening. How much of the accepted knife vocabulary can be removed and still have a functioning knife?

They give me the opportunity to start reappraising the role of the domesticity and feminity in knives. Knifemaking is traditionally seen as a very male trade but during my research into Sheffield knifemaking, the role of women keeps cropping up. Much of the piece work for folder parts was done by women in their homes, usually their kitchen or a small outhouse. I suspect that the awareness of these invisible women will manifest itself in future knives too.

Most of the foundation work is woollen felt and I use a mixture of wet felting and needle felting to create the desired affect. Some pieces are numo felted; incorporating silk, cotton and other mesh in the structure of the felt. The surface is then stitched, reworked, embroidered and embellished.