13" dressmakers

2019

  • Shape - craft
  • Handle material - glove leather
more...

£1300

Hand stitched, leather bounded bows for a comfortable, luxurious feel and embellished with vintage (circa 1920) iron beads.

Vintage dropforged blanks, reground and finished.

'Lotus' Scissors

2019

  • Shape - craft
  • Blade material - EN42j Steel
  • Handle material - Wrought Iron
  • Pins - 14ct & 8ct yellow gold
more...

£3000

These scissors were inspired by a pair of scissors displayed in the Deutsches KlingenMuseum in Solingen.  The label stated that they were Indian C1700 and they struck me as being very delicate looking considering their size.  My notes say that they appeared to be approximately 12-13” long.

Although the design was very much inspired by these original scissors, in no way were they designed to be replicas.  Very quickly, the forms deviated from the original; smoothing out spirals and adjusting proportions.

The choice of materials was critical.  Bows of scissors are traditionally left soft to allow for adjustment as they get sharpened during their life span.  I wanted a texture on the finished piece so I chose a wrought iron that could be etched.  The inside of the blades is EN42j, a tool steel with a lot of spring to it that can be hardened to make a nice cutting surface.

#2

2019

  • Shape - craft
  • Blade material - O-1 Steel
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£300

Each pair is numbered in the 'under' between the blades. “matching marks (symbols or numbers) are sometimes seen near the pivot area inside both blades. In Sheffield, these were hardened and ground together. In some cases these marks indicated that the two blades were forged together from the same piece of steel to ensure that both were of the same hardness. This coding enabled them to be matched together after they were tempered, ground and polished. If one blade was even slightly harder than the other, it would wear down and blunt the softer blade.” The Cutting Edge – Antique Scissors, Carolyn Meacham 2006

These days, with increased control over the alloy content of steel and the precisely controlled industrial heat treatment of the parts, this matching isn't the issue that it once was. Obviously, given the complexity of having every item in batch being different, numbering the halves is still important in the process.

#4

2019

  • Shape - craft
  • Blade material - O-1 Steel
more...

Each pair is numbered in the 'under' between the blades. “matching marks (symbols or numbers) are sometimes seen near the pivot area inside both blades. In Sheffield, these were hardened and ground together. In some cases these marks indicated that the two blades were forged together from the same piece of steel to ensure that both were of the same hardness. This coding enabled them to be matched together after they were tempered, ground and polished. If one blade was even slightly harder than the other, it would wear down and blunt the softer blade.” The Cutting Edge – Antique Scissors, Carolyn Meacham 2006

These days, with increased control over the alloy content of steel and the precisely controlled industrial heat treatment of the parts, this matching isn't the issue that it once was. Obviously, given the complexity of having every item in batch being different, numbering the halves is still important in the process.

Desk scissors (left)

2019

  • Shape - craft
  • Handle material - Chad Nichols Boomerang Mokume Gane
more...

£300

These are left handed scissors with an asymmetrical tip with a leather drop-in sheath.

The bows are made from Chad Nicholls Boomerang Mokume Gane (copper, nickel, brass)

Desk Scissors

2019

  • Shape - craft
  • Handle material - Chad Nichols Boomerang Mokume Gane
more...

£300

These are right handed scissors with an asymmetrical tip with a leather drop-in sheath.

The bows are made from Chad Nicholls Boomerang Mokume Gane (copper, nickel, brass)

Iron Lace

2016

  • Shape - craft
  • Blade material - O-1
  • Handle material - 0.25mm iron wire and 99.5% pure; 0.25mm 18ct gold wire.
more...

£2000

This was one of the maddest project that I've done. Inspired by the filigree and lace that is carved into many Victorian Exhibition scissors, I decided to actually MAKE the lace in iron wire.

The full process can be seen in David Darom's stunningly beautiful "WORLD of ART Knives, Vol. IV".

The blending of contrasts; domestic and industrial, textile and metal, robust and delicate, has been a steady thread of inspiration to me over the years. 'Iron Lace' was originally intended to be a technical piece; a vehicle to carry the technical challenge of making iron wire lace. The final design was dictated by the requirements of the delicate lace, the solid steel shanks curving around to protect the more fragile shear wire that they supported. The lace feels like it should be tucked away and hidden discreetly from public view.

The scissors are designed for the light cutting of delicate textiles and I like the way the lace element echoes the intended end use.

'V1' Scissors (1- 5 of 15)

2016

  • Shape - craft
  • Blade material - BS EN10083 C50E
more...

£300

At the end of 2015, when I was down at Ernest Wright & Son (Sheffield), talking to the scissor makers and picking their brains, I came across a small number of obsolete vintage scissor blanks. Not enough to justify them setting up to make them, I took some to play with. People have been asking for me to make more general purpose scissors and by starting with the rough blanks, I have been able to rescue some abandoned Sheffield heritage and produce 'working' scissors rather than fancy exhibition pieces.

One of the aspects of the project was to see how differently the pieces could be from the same initial shape. The way that the flat profile is shaped can dramatically change the feel of the finished piece. It is easy to see in Victorian catalogues that variations at this stage were used to create an entire range, from basic working pieces to highly carved ornate ones – all filed and ground from the same blank shape. I do most of this work with files. I like being able to take my time and see the shape develop under my fingers. It gives me time to assess the work and change it as it is needed.

There are four main area that have variations; the blade profile (flat, dagger, round) the pivot area (straight, waisted), the shank shape (thigh, bandy) and the interaction between the shanks and the bows (blended, dramatic).

Each pair is numbered in the 'under' between the blades. “matching marks (symbols or numbers) are sometimes seen near the pivot area inside both blades. In Sheffield, these were hardened and ground together. In some cases these marks indicated that the two blades were forged together from the same piece of steel to ensure that both were of the same hardness. This coding enabled them to be matched together after they were tempered, ground and polished. If one blade was even slightly harder than the other, it would wear down and blunt the softer blade.” The Cutting Edge – Antique Scissors, Carolyn Meacham 2006

These days, with increased control over the alloy content of steel and the precisely controlled industrial heat treatment of the parts, this matching isn't the issue that it once was. Obviously, given the complexity of having every item in batch being different, numbering the halves was vital in this project.

'V1' Scissors (6- 10 of 15)

2016

  • Shape - craft
  • Blade material - BS EN10083 C50E
more...

£300

At the end of 2015, when I was down at Ernest Wright & Son (Sheffield), talking to the scissor makers and picking their brains, I came across a small number of obsolete vintage scissor blanks. Not enough to justify them setting up to make them, I took some to play with. People have been asking for me to make more general purpose scissors and by starting with the rough blanks, I have been able to rescue some abandoned Sheffield heritage and produce 'working' scissors rather than fancy exhibition pieces.

One of the aspects of the project was to see how differently the pieces could be from the same initial shape. The way that the flat profile is shaped can dramatically change the feel of the finished piece. It is easy to see in Victorian catalogues that variations at this stage were used to create an entire range, from basic working pieces to highly carved ornate ones – all filed and ground from the same blank shape. I do most of this work with files. I like being able to take my time and see the shape develop under my fingers. It gives me time to assess the work and change it as it is needed.

There are four main area that have variations; the blade profile (flat, dagger, round) the pivot area (straight, waisted), the shank shape (thigh, bandy) and the interaction between the shanks and the bows (blended, dramatic).

Each pair is numbered in the 'under' between the blades. “matching marks (symbols or numbers) are sometimes seen near the pivot area inside both blades. In Sheffield, these were hardened and ground together. In some cases these marks indicated that the two blades were forged together from the same piece of steel to ensure that both were of the same hardness. This coding enabled them to be matched together after they were tempered, ground and polished. If one blade was even slightly harder than the other, it would wear down and blunt the softer blade.” The Cutting Edge – Antique Scissors, Carolyn Meacham 2006

These days, with increased control over the alloy content of steel and the precisely controlled industrial heat treatment of the parts, this matching isn't the issue that it once was. Obviously, given the complexity of having every item in batch being different, numbering the halves was vital in this project.

'V1' Scissors (11-15 of 15)

2016

  • Shape - craft
  • Blade material - BS EN10083 C50E
more...

£300

At the end of 2015, when I was down at Ernest Wright & Son (Sheffield), talking to the scissor makers and picking their brains, I came across a small number of obsolete vintage scissor blanks. Not enough to justify them setting up to make them, I took some to play with. People have been asking for me to make more general purpose scissors and by starting with the rough blanks, I have been able to rescue some abandoned Sheffield heritage and produce 'working' scissors rather than fancy exhibition pieces.

One of the aspects of the project was to see how differently the pieces could be from the same initial shape. The way that the flat profile is shaped can dramatically change the feel of the finished piece. It is easy to see in Victorian catalogues that variations at this stage were used to create an entire range, from basic working pieces to highly carved ornate ones – all filed and ground from the same blank shape. I do most of this work with files. I like being able to take my time and see the shape develop under my fingers. It gives me time to assess the work and change it as it is needed.

There are four main area that have variations; the blade profile (flat, dagger, round) the pivot area (straight, waisted), the shank shape (thigh, bandy) and the interaction between the shanks and the bows (blended, dramatic).

Each pair is numbered in the 'under' between the blades. “matching marks (symbols or numbers) are sometimes seen near the pivot area inside both blades. In Sheffield, these were hardened and ground together. In some cases these marks indicated that the two blades were forged together from the same piece of steel to ensure that both were of the same hardness. This coding enabled them to be matched together after they were tempered, ground and polished. If one blade was even slightly harder than the other, it would wear down and blunt the softer blade.” The Cutting Edge – Antique Scissors, Carolyn Meacham 2006

These days, with increased control over the alloy content of steel and the precisely controlled industrial heat treatment of the parts, this matching isn't the issue that it once was. Obviously, given the complexity of having every item in batch being different, numbering the halves was vital in this project.